Copy of Newton Brown’s “Sanctuary”

During our Lander/Sinks Canyon Recon, we visited the Pioneer Museum of the American West. It was very nicely laid out, with a very well curated, if small, research library. After getting permission to use it, I headed for the file cabinets, and pulled “B” for “Brown,” since it seems I’m always looking for options. Amongst the file folders for “Fort Brown,” “Frederick Brown,” “Brown Family,” and “Brown’s Spring,”  I discovered a thick manila folder labeled “Newton Brown.” He was an icon in Lander, having surveyed most of the area. Later in the week we discovered he engineered the hydro-electric dam on the Middle Popo Agie between The Sinks and The Rise. There was much more, but, I highly recommend you perform your own research on him.

Amongst the documents in the folder, I discovered a typed document written in a narrative style by Mr. Brown. It is entitled “Sanctuary.” After reading the first few paragraphs I was reminded of Fenn. There are no clues in the document, but it is very well written, and if there was a Bible of the Outdoors, it should be included.

Click on the image of the cover to start your download.

Shelley and Toby Interview with Asahi TV in Japan!

Shelley and I just completed a 45-minute-long interview with producers and directors from the Japanese equivalent of “Good Morning America” on Japan’s Asahi TV! Apparently, they’ve become interested in treasure hunting, and especially the hunt for Forrest Fenn’s treasure. We spoke with a translator whose English was a good as most Americans and her questions were very incisive and thought-out. They plan to run the segment in about two weeks, and will send us a copy when it has run. We’ll share it with you then.

 

Why did Forrest Fenn put strands of his hair in the sealed olive jar?

The simplest answer: So his hair could be used as a basis for DNA testing to prove, without equivocation, that it was the owner of those strands of hair had placed the treasure in its hiding place.

That also means it is very likely that Fenn’s autobiography end’s with a paragraph something like this:

“I, Forrest Fenn, wrote this autobiography, placed it in this olive jar, and sealed the olive jar with wax. I, Forrest Fenn, placed this treasure in its hiding place with the expectation that, someday, someone would find it. I, Forrest Fenn, am of sound mind. I, Forrest Fenn, make this decision freely. I, Forrest Fenn, transfer the title of ownership of this treasure to the person who finds it. I, Forrest Fenn, have placed strands of my hair in the sealed olive jar with the expectation that they will be used for DNA testing as evidence that the preceding statements were written by me.”

Here’s my problem with it.

Proof of “ownership” via DNA testing would only be meaningful if the following two conditions existed:

  1. Fenn was still living when the treasure was found.
  2. The treasure was found before Fenn published “The Thrill of the Chase” in 2010.

If Fenn was no longer living when the treasure was found, a DNA sample would be irrelevant.

If Fenn hid the treasure after he published his book, a DNA sample would be irrelevant, regardless of when the treasure was found.

To put it another way, if Fenn hid the treasure before publishing his book, and if someone found the treasure before he published his book, the strands of hair would have value. Otherwise, they are meaningless.

Bottom Line: We believe Fenn hid the treasure before 2009/2010. That he had the foresight to place strands of his hair in the olive jar support that hypothesis.